Started here. Lately I’ve been thinking about getting rid of stuff. There are two problems: stuff I don’t currently use but will probably need later, and lack of storage space for stuff I don’t use frequently. I want to be all minimal and streamlined. I feel a bit weighed down by owning large pieces of furniture, which I suppose has to come with adulthood, and the furniture is terribly useful, but I guess I’m nostalgic for the time when I could pack everything I owned into a ’68 Dodge Coronet. But that was when I lived in a dorm and owned two mugs and a bowl and a plate and slept on a single futon. Now there are things like bookshelves and kitchen tables and couches and washers. Just knowing that whenever I move next, it will all have to be lugged around.

I also go back and forth between thinking things like, “I should see how long I can live off the food in the pantry & just buy fresh fruits & vegetables,” and “I could really use some new clothes for spring, nice things that I’ll wear for a long time.” And then I’ll have sushi for lunch and go into a couple clothing stores and not buy a single thing.

Anyway, things to get rid of:

-my desktop computer, circa 1999.
-the leftovers in the fridge that no one will ever eat.
-clothes I don’t wear.
-this quilt. By making it and giving it away.
-the leftover potatoes (check).

Things to acquire:

-a pair of shoes to wear in Kate’s wedding (with this dress, in espresso. Suggestions welcomed).
-a running habit
-new shirts for spring
-coffee. I really really really want to drink my way through a vat of lattes. It is my Greatest Temptation and I’m not holding out very well.
-prints of some of my favorites of the pictures I’ve taken since getting a digital camera.

I could actually write a whole post about coffee right now. (Because of the whole cream/milk addiction and not being willing to stoop to coffee defiled by soymilk, coffee is kind of out during Lent. Not to say that I’ve (ahem) completely abstained.) Coffee is like a really good friend. You spend a lot of time with it, and want to include it in all social occasions. But then Coffee moves away. At first it really hurts. The pain of separation. You cry a little. So many things remind you of your good friend Coffee – the cafe where you used to hang out together, going grocery shopping, waking up in the morning. The pain dulls over time, but you always carry it with you, you know.

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